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Payoff Addresses

PNC Bank Payoff Address! (Full 2022 Guide!)

Jamey Muller
Updated: October 21, 2022
3 min read

PNC Bank offers specific addresses and phone numbers for standard and overnight payoff checks. However, finding the correct payoff address and phone number can be quite tricky.

Below, I have listed the PNC Bank payoff address, the PNC Bank overnight payoff address, and the PNC Bank payoff phone number.

PNC Bank Payoff Address:

PNC Bank
P.O.Box 747066
Pittsburgh, PA 15274-7066

Note that your PNC Bank payoff address might be different, it is best to give PNC Bank a call, or request a payoff letter before sending your check.

PNC Bank Overnight Payoff Address:

c/o PNC Bank
Lockbox 747066
500 First Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Note that your PNC Bank overnight payoff address might be different, it is best to give PNC Bank a call, or request a payoff letter before sending your check.

Also, check the terms of PNC Bank for sending overnight payments. They might require you to use FedEx, or a different delivery service, when sending overnight payments.

PNC Bank Payoff Phone Number:

(800) 366-9212

It’s best to give PNC Bank a call to check that you have the right address and correct payoff amount before sending your check.

Where Can I Find My PNC Bank Payoff Address?

The easiest way to find the correct payoff address is to call PNC Bank.

PNC Bank, as most other financing companies, like PenFed, or Ally Financial, offer a number of specific P.O. boxes and physical addresses to mail your standard, or overnight checks to.

Alternatively, you might also be able to complete your PNC Bank payoff payment by logging in to your account, selecting “Profile”, or “Manage Account”, then selecting “Request A Quote”.

If you choose to call PNC Bank or use their online services you won’t have an official and more importantly legally binding document. That's why I always recommend requesting a payoff letter from PNC Bank.

Request A Payoff Letter From PNC Bank:

When you want to pay off a loan it’s hard to find out exactly how much you need to pay. Interest is added to your loan balance every day (or sometimes once a month), that’s why your loan balance changes daily.

If you write your payoff check using the loan balance from your last statement you probably fail to pay the full amount.

This will be a frustrating experience for you, you’ll need to get in contact with PNC Bank, send an additional check, and wait longer to pay off your loan.

That’s where a payoff letter comes in, you can request a payoff letter directly from PNC Bank by calling their customer service or sending them a message. A payoff letter is an official document that lists the following:

  • The date the payoff amount expires
  • If a cashier’s check is required
  • Where to send the check to (the payoff address)
  • If you have to include any extra charges with your final payment (closing fees or penalties, for example)

Most lenders send the payoff letter within a few days, the maximum they have to send the payoff letter according to federal law is seven days.

Note: Some lenders have a different definition of what a payoff letter is. They use the term payoff letter to describe a letter that states that the loan has been paid off and functions as proof that the loan no longer exists.

What Happens If You Mailed Your Check To The Wrong Address?

If you mail your check to the wrong address there can be delays which usually mean that you have to pay additional fees.

To prevent additional fees you should call PNC Bank, or request a payoff letter to double-check that the address hasn’t been changed and that you wrote the correct amount on your payoff check.

Payoff amounts include not only principal and interest they also include prepayment fees or any other additional fees. Therefore it’s important to send the check with the correct payoff amount to the right address, if the check doesn’t reach PNC Bank at the right address, or the payoff amount isn’t correct more interest will accumulate over time.

Written by
Jamey Muller
I'm the head-writer @ Knowledge Eager (or, in plain English, I'm the guy writing the majority of the content here). Addicted to the stock market, football, sushi and tacos.
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Jamey Muller
I'm the head-writer @ Knowledge Eager (or, in plain English, I'm the guy writing the majority of the content here). Addicted to the stock market, football, sushi and tacos.